Resilience is…

Resilience is …

You don’t need to be reminded that we’re now into our 14th month of a world-wide pandemic. We’re all experiencing it differently but the one thing that we all likely have in common is that we are tired of being on this Covid wheel of life without any real opportunity for renewal. I’m not a marathon runner by any means; but it seems to me that it’s like being on a marathon with a moving finish line. That in itself is an exhausting thought.

Leadership in challenging times

According to authors Bruce J. AvolioT, William L. Gardner in a paper entitled Authentic leadership development: Getting to the root of positive forms of leadership:

“Leadership has always been more difficult in challenging times, but the unique stressors facing organizations throughout the world today call for a renewed focus on what constitutes genuine leadership. Public, private, and even volunteer organizations are addressing challenges that run the gamut from ethical meltdowns to terrorism and SARS. What constitutes the normal range of functioning in these conditions is constantly shifting upwards as new challenges, technologies, market demands, and competition emerge. We suggest that such challenges have precipitated a renewed focus on restoring confidence, hope, and optimism; being able to rapidly bounce back from catastrophic events and display resiliency; helping people in their search for meaning and connection by fostering a new self-awareness; and genuinely relating to all stakeholders (associates, customers, suppliers, owners, and communities).”

Calm and Confident

This idea of bouncing back or as the authors state “rapidly bounce back” is part of the formula of resilience but the other important component is personal growth. According to the American Psychological Association, “As much as resilience involves “bouncing back” from these difficult experiences, it can also involve profound personal growth.”

Back in another life, I used to ask myself “how much broader do my shoulders really need to be?” every time I encountered a tough time. What I didn’t realize is that I was making the connection between resilience and personal growth.

Very often, the difference between success and failure is resilience. The more resilient we are, the easier it is to navigate challenges confidently and emerge successfully on the other side.

More and more, resilience is a quality we will ALL need to cultivate. The world is changing quickly, and we are faced with more challenges than ever. If we can stay calm, confident, and flexible during tough times, we are more likely to thrive.

Reflection Questions:

What are some difficulties you are facing in your life right now?

How are you responding to these challenges?

How might you alter your response to be more calm, confident and resilient?



Resilience: Top 10 Tips

Resilience: Top 10 Tips

Resilience continues to be a key strength and advantage particularly throughout the pandemic. Thanks to the Institute of Coaching’s Masterclass, I am happy to sharie these resilience tips with you.

Top 10 Resilience Tips

  1. Be compassionate with yourself
  2. Ground yourself in the idea that courage is not the absence of fear
  3. Be proactive in spotting the positive in the negative with realistic optimism
  4. Never stop cultivating confidence
  5. Take care of your body and your health
  6. Work on being calm, to enable you to make the right decisions in the moment
  7. Rely on support systems you have in place – we are not in this alone
  8. Be purposeful and engage in productive and meaningful activities
  9. Engage in nourishing habits like mindfulness, food and sleep, and social interactions
  10. Keep your eyes open for signs of stress including non-verbals in yourself and others

Which tip will you use first?

Influence: Art & Science

Influence: An Art & A Science

Leaders often find themselves in high-stakes influence conversations. Influence is having a conversation with a clear outcome, so that the other person thinks, feels and behaves how you wanted them to think, feel and behave…with authenticity and without manipulation.

The most successful leaders....

The most successful leaders influence others to embrace and implement their ideas. There is an art and a science to influence, and to knowing the right conversations to have with others in order to get results, while still keeping the relationship strong.

Do you know someone that is an effective influencer? How would you describe that person? Certainly well developed emotional intelligence comes to mind. But what else? What’s the secret?

Can you relate to any of these statements?

You can learn

There are steps you can take to learn that art and science of influence. One of the steps involves being prepared and having your bases covered before going into a high-stakes conversation.

Click on the worksheet image to the right to download your copy of our Influence Planning Tool.

Being prepared and anticipating situations will help you move the yardstick in the direction you want.

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Limiting Beliefs Holding You Back?

According to the Institute of Coaching, “We each carry a set of beliefs that we live by. Certain beliefs you hold consciously, while others are mainly unconscious. Beliefs develop out of past experiences and our interpretations of those experiences. Growing up, we also develop beliefs when we internalize the messages we receive from social conditioning. Since many beliefs are based on past experiences, they may limit us in the present. For example, a pertinent belief at age ten will most likely be limiting to you at age thirty. Some of the conscious and unconscious beliefs that you develop limit your ability to grow and move forward in your life.”

One example might be to make a certain income which would be a sign of success. Yet, it doesn’t happen and you’re not sure why. Upon reflection and perhaps some skillful coaching, you might uncover that you have a limiting belief around making more money.  The IOC continues in saying, “Until you begin to alter your beliefs about money, it will be difficult for you to listen to your inner voice and its messages to you about financial abundance.”  

This is only one example of a limiting belief. There are many more. 

So why would you want to challenge yourself and your limiting beliefs? Because, it’s what will shatter that glass or concrete ceiling that is holding you back. As the IOC states, “Releasing a belief that limits you puts you back in the driver’s seat of your life. You, rather than an old belief, make the choices that are right for you and allow you to fulfill your potential.”

Want to explore more about limiting beliefs? Then join me on Monday, March 8th at noon (EST) for my International Women’s Day 30-min Brown Bag Lunch n’ Learn  “Up Your Game: Choose to Challenge Yourself” webinar in honour of this year’s theme #ChooseToChallenge. There is no charge for the event and it’s open to everyone, not just those that identify as women. It’s time to up your game and challenge yourself! 

To learn more about this complimentary event, click on the button below to be redirected to our IWD 2021 #ChooseToChallenge event page.

What our brains reveals_LI

What Our Brain Reveals About Emotions & Learning

Development plans should include working on competencies that are either required to perform better in your current role or to prepare you for a future role. But did you know that you may not be as open to all learning?

What our brains reveals_LI

Development plans should include working on competencies that are either required to perform better in your current role or to prepare you for a future role. But did you know that you may not be as open to all learning?

If only we could uncover our own or our staff’s hidden beliefs silently undermining any development efforts? TTI Success Insight’s Center for Applied Cognitive Research (this our strategic partner) is doing just that, and the results may surprise you and solve many of your training dilemmas. 

One of the assessments we use is the TriMetrix® DNA™ part of which measures competence in 25 work-related skills. You can find more information about this assessment on our website’s Assessment Centre page. TTI SI started 

with assessment volunteer candidates for this research project. They  knew exactly which competencies were well-developed, developed, moderately developed or not yet developed. That was the baseline.

Their research affirmed that skills are experience-based but most importantly, that each one is connected to an emotional reaction. The emotional reaction can be positive, negative or neutral. Someone with a positive reaction to a competency/skill, will have a positive learning experience in the particular skill that they have a positive emotional reaction to. While someone with an emotional aversion to a competency/skill may not. Some people don’t necessarily have a positive or negative emotional reaction thus likely little impact on their learning to either extreme.

In the TTI SI lab, they are deep into neuroscience. During the trials, this is what they found a brain looks like when there is a positive, neutral and negative response to a learning event:

Brain_Emotions_975x418

Our research affirms skills are experience based and tied directly to emotional reactions.

Dr. Ron Bonstetter, Senior Vice-President of Research & Development, TTI Success Insights

The key finding from this research is to uncover any negative assumptions, beliefs or self doubts that you or your staff may have with respect to the learning prior to designing a learning and development plan.

The Implications

According to TTI SI, “The big takeaway is that some marginally developed skills may be extremely difficult to be more proficient in, due to negative subconscious emotional baggage people unknowingly hold on to as deep beliefs about themself.”  Furthermore, “When an individual holds strong beliefs, it may be easier to develop skills for which they have little or no previous experience than to tackle a developmental plan encumbered by self-doubt or worse, total aversion to the concept.” 

Want to Learn More?

You can download the full white paper by clicking here.

Resilience_LinkedIN

When the Going Gets Tough: Coping

“No one escapes pain, fear, and suffering. Yet from pain can come wisdom, from fear can come courage, from suffering can come strength – if we have the virtue of resilience.”

— Eric Greitens, Resilience: Hard-won wisdom for living a better life

Resilience_LinkedIN

According to apa.org ,“Psychologists define resilience as the process of adapting well in the face of adversity, trauma, tragedy, threats, or significant sources of stress—such as family and relationship problems, serious health problems, or workplace and financial stressors.”

Those two words, “adapting well” in that definition make all the difference as to how resilient you actually are. They continue on by saying “With the right tools and supports in place, one thing is sure: You will not only make it through the challenges of your river adventure.You will also merge a more confident and courageous rafter.”

Adapting Well

Honestly, I couldn’t imagine white water rafting – not sure that I am ready to develop that type of resilience but I have made it through some tough challenges and I know that I am more resilient as a result.” I used to say, how much broader do my shoulders need to be…well, as it turns out that developing our resilience is an ongoing exercise. Each instance strengthens our coping muscles so that we come out stronger and better prepared for future challenges.

No matter what challenges we experience, one thing we can control is how we respond to them. Some coping strategies are negative or even destructive, while others are positive and life-affirming. Some people try to avoid the situation, others resort to alcohol to numb the pain, but some manage to tap into resources of inner strength that they never knew they had.

Your Story

Think Back to a Time...

Think about challenges you’ve experienced in the past, and take some time to reflect and list some of them.

Ask yourself these questions: 

  • How did I cope at the time? 
  • How would I cope now in that same situation?
  • Has anything changed?
  • Which of my coping strategies are positive, and which ones are negative?

Share your Story

Would you like to share your story of a situation from your past? If so, we would love to hear about it. Tell us what the situation was. How you coped then. How you might cope differently today? How you have grown as a result of the challenge and increased your resilience. 

If you would like to share your story with me, please do so in confidence through my Google Forms link by clicking here. The link will take you to a Google Form with the questions above. If your story is chosen as one that would be great to share, we will only do so with your express written permission.