What Jazzes You?

What Jazzes You?

Did you know that April 30th is really International Jazz Day. This isn’t one of those made up international day of the whatever. It’s a real thing!

What does UNESCO have to do with it?

According to jazzday.com “In November 2011, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) officially designated April 30 as International Jazz Day in order to highlight jazz and its diplomatic role of uniting people in all corners of the globe. International Jazz Day is chaired and led by UNESCO Director General Audrey Azoulay and legendary jazz pianist and composer Herbie Hancock, who serves as a UNESCO Ambassador for Intercultural Dialogue and Chairman of the Herbie Hancock Institute of Jazz.”

Jazz is probably one of the most misunderstood genres of music. Likely because it encompasses so many different styles of music. The beautiful thing about jazz is that it is a unifying form of music regardless of the style. How do I know? UNESCO said so!

Challenge #1: Step out of your comfort zone...

In celebration of International Jazz Day, I am challenging you to listen to a work of jazz that you’ve not listened to before. Perhaps, you may even challenge yourself further by listening to a work of jazz from another part of the world.

So why am I writing about this today? Besides the fact that I love many forms of jazz, it’s about feeling one with the world and stretching ourselves out of our comfort zone or perspective. I have a friend that has often said “I hate jazz.” Period – end of conversation. What he’s not done is taken any time to even explore what jazz is.

As a small step in your personal growth, I’m challenging you to step out of your comfort zone for a few minutes today to listen to something new.

The music field was the first to break down racial barriers, because in order to play together, you have to love the people you are playing with, and if you have any racial inhibitions, you wouldn't be able to do that.                 Oscar Peterson, Great Canadian Jazz Pianist

The music field was the first to break down racial barriers, because in order to play together, you have to love the people you are playing with, and if you have any racial inhibitions, you wouldn’t be able to do that.

Challenge #2: Answer this question...

Secondly, how about reflecting and asking yourself “What jazzes me?”

But wait... I have something new for you today!

Each week in this blog, there will be a personal reflection form related to the topic of the article. I hope you use the fillable pdf worksheets as a tool for reflection and growth. You can download it by clicking on the button just below here.